Java

Connecting to the Salesforce REST APIs with Spring Boot and Java

Broadly speaking there are two types of integrations with Salesforce, either a system-to-system integration or a user interface integration. One of the primary ways to do these integrations is by using the Salesforce REST API. When using the Salesforce REST API you need to obtain an access token that identifies who is making the requests. OAuth 2 provides an HTTP interface to obtain a Salesforce access token. When using the Salesforce OAuth 2 API there are three options for obtaining an access token:

The 6 Minute Cloud/Local Dev Roundtrip with Spring Boot

Great developer experiences allow you go from nothing to something amazing in under ten minutes. So I’m always trying to see how much I can minimize getting started experiences. My latest attempt is to deploy a Spring Boot app on Heroku, download the source to a developer’s machine, setup & run the app locally, make & test changes, and then redeploy those changes — all in under ten minutes (assuming a fast internet connection).

Quick Force Java – Getting Started with Salesforce REST in Java

Recently I blogged about a toolchain that quickly gets you going with the Salesforce REST APIs. I believe developers should be able to get started with new technologies without having to install tons of stuff and struggle for days. That blog used Quick Force Node for those who want to use JavaScript / Node.js. I’ve had a number of requests for a Java version of this toolchain so I created Quick Force Java.

Salesforce Canvas Quick Start for Java Developers

Salesforce provides a variety of different ways to integrate external apps into the Salesforce UI. Canvas is an iframe-based approach for loading externally hosted UIs into pages on Salesforce. The nice thing about Canvas versus a plain iframe is that Canvas has a JavaScript bridge which enables secure communication between the external iframe and Salesforce. This communication happens in the context of the Salesforce user and doesn’t require the typical OAuth handshake.

Java Doesn’t Suck – You’re Just Using it Wrong

Check out the Russian translation provided by Everycloudtech. Or check out a Ukrainian translation provided by OpenSourceInitiative. I’ve been building enterprise Java web apps since servlets were created. In that time the Java ecosystem has changed a lot but sadly many enterprise Java developers are stuck in some very painful and inefficient ways of doing things. In my travels I continue to see Java The Sucky Parts - but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Presenting Going Reactive with Java 8 Next Week in Boulder & Denver

Next week I will be presenting Going Reactive with Java 8 at the Boulder and Denver Java User Groups. Here is the session description: Java 8’s lambdas make building Reactive applications a whole lot easier and cleaner. Through copious code examples this session will show you how to build event-driven, scalable, resilient, and responsive applications with Java 8, Play Framework and Akka. On the web side you will learn about using lambdas for async & non-blocking requests & WebSockets.

Going Reactive with Java 8 – Tonight at Triangle JUG

Tonight I will be presenting Going Reactive with Java 8 at the Triangle Java Users Group. Here is the session description: Java 8’s lambdas make building Reactive applications a whole lot easier and cleaner. Through copious code examples this session will show you how to build event-driven, scalable, resilient, and responsive applications with Java 8, Play Framework and Akka. On the web side you will learn about using lambdas for async & non-blocking requests & WebSockets.

Utah JUG: Client/Server Apps with Play Framework, HTML5 and Java

Tonight (Feburary 21, 2013) I will be presenting at the Utah JUG about Client/Server Apps with Play Framework, HTML5 and Java. Here is the session description: The web application landscape is rapidly shifting back to a Client/Server architecture. This time around, the Client is JavaScript, HTML, and CSS in the browser. The tools and deployment techniques for these types of applications are abundant and fragmented. This session will teach you how to pull together jQuery, LESS, Twitter, Bootstrap, and some CoffeeScript to build the Client.

Presenting in Dallas: Play Framework, HTML5 and Java

Tomorrow (December 12, 2012) I will be presenting in Dallas at the JavaMUG about Client/Server Apps with Play Framework, HTML5 and Java. Here is the session abstract: The web application landscape is rapidly shifting back to a Client/Server architecture. This time around, the Client is JavaScript, HTML, and CSS in the browser. The tools and deployment techniques for these types of applications are abundant and fragmented. This session will teach you how to pull together jQuery, LESS, Twitter, Bootstrap, and some CoffeeScript to build the Client.

Presenting at GraphConnect 2012: Building & Deploying Graph-based Web Apps

On November 6th I will be presenting Building & Deploying Graph-based Web Apps at the GraphConnect 2012 conference in San Francisco. Here is the session description: This session will teach you how to build a Graph-based web application with Java, Play Framework, and Neo4j. You will also lean how to deploy the application on the cloud with Heroku. The session will primarily be code and live demos. I hope to see you there!