Reactive Web Request Batching with Scala and Play Framework

At first glance it seems silly to do batching in the reactive world. When I first started with reactive programming I thought I wouldn’t have to worry about things like resource starvation. After all, the reactive magic bullet was *magical*! But my magic bullet fizzled when it hit downstream resource constraints causing me to need batching. With a reactive web client library like Play Framework’s, I can easily spin up tens of thousands of web requests, in parallel, using very little resources.

Machine Learning on Heroku with PredictionIO

Last week at the TrailheaDX Salesforce Dev Conference we launched the DreamHouse sample application to showcase the Salesforce App Cloud and numerous possible integrations. I built an integration with the open source PredictionIO Machine Learning framework. The use case for ML in DreamHouse is a real estate recommendation engine that learns based on users with similar favorites. Check out a demo and get the source. For the DreamHouse PredictionIO integration to work I needed to get the PredictionIO service running on Heroku.

Combining Reactive Streams, Heroku Kafka, and Play Framework

Heroku recently announced early access to the new Heroku Kafka service and while I’ve heard great things about Apache Kafka I hadn’t played with it because I’m too lazy to set that kind of stuff up on my own. Now that I can setup a Kafka cluster just by provisioning a Heroku Addon I figured it was time to give it a try. If you aren’t familiar with Kafka it is kinda a next generation messaging system.

Building a Mock HVAC for Smart Thermostat Demos

Update: I’ve added instructions for a cooling system at the bottom of this post. Recently I needed to create a mock HVAC system so that I could have a portable smart thermostat for various demos. I searched around but couldn’t find any such thing. So with some sleuthing and the help of my friend Bruce Eckel I was able to build a simple system that powers a smart thermostat and simulates a heating system.

The 6 Minute Cloud/Local Dev Roundtrip with Spring Boot

Great developer experiences allow you go from nothing to something amazing in under ten minutes. So I’m always trying to see how much I can minimize getting started experiences. My latest attempt is to deploy a Spring Boot app on Heroku, download the source to a developer’s machine, setup & run the app locally, make & test changes, and then redeploy those changes — all in under ten minutes (assuming a fast internet connection).

Pulling Go Code Colorado Data into Salesforce

This weekend I’m at the Go Code Colorado Challenge Weekend event in Durango. The purpose of Go Code Colorado 2016 is for teams to build something useful for businesses using one or more of the Colorado Public Datasets. Some teams are using Salesforce for the back-office / business process side of the app they are building. So I decided to see if I could pull a Colorado Public Dataset into Salesforce.

Quick Force Java – Getting Started with Salesforce REST in Java

Recently I blogged about a toolchain that quickly gets you going with the Salesforce REST APIs. I believe developers should be able to get started with new technologies without having to install tons of stuff and struggle for days. That blog used Quick Force Node for those who want to use JavaScript / Node.js. I’ve had a number of requests for a Java version of this toolchain so I created Quick Force Java.

Salesforce REST APIs – From Zero to Cloud to Local Dev in Minutes

When getting acquainted with new technologies I believe that users shouldn’t have to spend more than 15 minutes getting something simple up and running. I wanted to apply this idea to building an app on the Salesforce REST APIs so I built Quick Force (Node). In about 12 minutes you can deploy a Node.js app on Heroku that uses the Salesforce REST APIs, setup OAuth, then pull the app down to your local machine, make and test changes, and then redeploy those changes.

Winter Tech Forum 2016 – My Favorite Developer Conference!

I’ve been to a TON of developer conferences and by a landslide my favorite is the Winter Tech Forum (which used to be the Java Posse Roundup). Here is why… Learning for me is experiential. Typical eyes-forward conferences are like being a passenger on a sail boat. I can watch what is happening but I could definitely not become the captain based on my experience as a passenger. This is what makes WTF different; every attendee is a captain (or maybe a skipper if you are new).

Dreamforce 2015 Video: Tour of Heroku + Salesforce Integration Methods

This year at Dreamforce I presented a session that walked through a few of the ways to integrate Heroku apps with Salesforce. Here is the session description: Combining customer-facing apps on Heroku with employee-facing apps on Salesforce enables a whole new generation of connected and intelligent experiences. There are four primary ways to do this integration: Heroku Connect, Canvas, Apex / Process Callouts, and the Salesforce REST APIs. Using code and architectural examples, we’ll walk through these different methods.